Phytophthora agathidicida

Kauri dieback disease

Also known as:

PTA

Family: Pythiaceae

Origin: Unknown

Trunk of large kauri tree with bleeding gum.
The most common symptoms of kauri dieback are bleeding gum, yellowing of leaves, thinning canopy and dead branches.

Regional Pest Management Plan (RPMP) status

  • Hauraki Gulf Controlled Area pest — Exclusion
  • Whole region — Sustained control
  • Unwanted organism

View more about the RPMP statuses

General description

Disease affecting kauri trees. Symptomatic trees exhibit root and collar rot, resin-exuding lesions, severe chlorosis, canopy thinning and mortality.

What you need to know

To help protect our environment:

  • You must not distribute, move or release kauri dieback anywhere in the region.
  • You must not move any untreated kauri plant material, soil or goods contaminated with soil into or out of an area within three times the drip line of any New Zealand kauri tree, unless the purpose of the movement is to dispose of the material at an Auckland Council approved containment landfill. Contact Auckland Council at pestfree@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz for information on approved landfills.
  • You must not move any untreated kauri plant material, soil or goods contaminated with soil to or among Hauraki Gulf Islands, unless the purpose of the movement is to dispose of the material at an Auckland Council approved containment landfill. Contact Auckland Council at pestfree@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz for information on approved landfills.
  • In the future, all commercial transport operators moving goods or people to or among Hauraki Gulf islands will need to have a Pest Free Warrant.

All occupiers of a commercial passenger boat or aircraft exit or entry point to the Hauraki Gulf Controlled Area islands must:

  • provide information, supplied by Auckland Council, to passengers about kauri dieback disease
  • provide space for an Auckland Council-maintained phytosanitary station for passengers to use to prevent the spread of kauri dieback disease.

Habitats

Capable of infecting and causing mortality in kauri trees of any age, in the wild as well as planted trees. Also known to be able to colonise some other plant species.

Impact on environment

Fatal to kauri of all ages. Has the potential to cause functional extinction of kauri, with major consequences for other plants and animals that depend on kauri.

Control

Recommended approaches

Always clean your footwear and equipment before and after visiting forests, offshore islands or any other natural ecosystems. Even a pinhead-sized amount of soil can spread kauri dieback.

Always stay on the marked track (keep your dog on a leash in kauri forests), avoid walking on kauri roots, and respect any track closures.

Caution: When using any herbicide or pesticide please read the label thoroughly to ensure that all instructions and safety requirements are followed.

Dead kauri in the canopy.
Kauri dieback can kill kauri of all ages.
Thinning canopy of a kauri tree.
Kauri dieback can be spread by just a pinhead of soil.
Close up photo of kauri trunk with bleeding gum.
There is no cure for kauri dieback disease.