Photo credit: Right and top left, Jay Farnworth; bottom left, DOC
Photo credit: Right and top left, Jay Farnworth; bottom left, DOC

Te tahumaero patu kauri

Kauri dieback disease

Keep up to date with the latest kauri dieback resources.

Photo credit: Right and top left, Jay Farnworth; bottom left, DOC

Our kauri, one of New Zealand’s taonga (treasures), are under threat from kauri dieback disease (Phytophthora agathidicida). The fungus-like organism is spread by very small amounts of mud or soil which infect the tree through its roots. 

Kauri play a key role in indigenous forest ecosystems of the upper North Island. They are also one of the largest and longest-living tree species in the world, with some trees reaching more than 1000 years old.

There is currently no proven cure or treatment for kauri dieback disease, and nearly all infected kauri die from it. Anything that can move soil (such as humans, equipment and large animals) can potentially spread the disease. 

See our Guide to managing kauri dieback.